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Published 15 January 2019 in 5G FWA
Tags: mmWave, 5G, FWA, millimeter wave, Millimetre wave, US spectrum auctions

Eric Miller, VP 5G Business Development

With 2018 behind us, it’s time now to look ahead to a new and exciting year for our industry.

In the last two years, it has been widely accepted that fixed wireless access (FWA) using mmWave spectrum has a significant role to play in the rollout of 5G. With the FCC hosting auctions at 24GHzand the bands above and the introduction of the first mainstream 5G use cases – as recently took place in South Korea – we expect adoption of FWA to proliferate throughout 2019.

Here’s a snapshot of how we think that will come to pass through the year ahead:

Millimeter Wave Spectrum Auctions

In its bid to promote the deployment of fifth-generation (5G) wireless, the Internet of Things (IoT), and other advanced spectrum-based services at frequencies above 24 GHz, the FCC opened its 28 GHz auction 101 in mid-November. The auction is still going with total bids approaching the $700 million mark, but activity has slowed and it is expected to conclude in the next couple of weeks. This auction is mainly comprised of smaller cities and rural areas and covers only about 25% of the US population. Even still, with the status of current bids, this puts the auction on par with or exceeding the Straightpath pricing metrics for the more populous license areas such as Mobile, Alabama; Charleston, South Carolina; and Honolulu, Hawaii.

On the other hand, many of the very rural licenses only have bids in the hundreds of dollars. On average the current pricing across all markets is around $0.011 per MHz-pop, with the most populous markets fetching 5 or 6 times that. Auction winners will not be revealed until the auction comes to a close, but we would expect Verizon to pick up higher tier markets to round out their national footprint of 28 GHz spectrum and regional telcos will pick up licenses within their respective service areas for future FWA and mobile 5G services.

Auction 102 for 24 GHz spectrum will kick off immediately following the 28 GHz. These licenses are for much larger geographic areas compared to auction 101 (counties) and are completely unencumbered. We assume there to be intense bidding for these licenses by the likes of AT&T and T-Mobile as they try to create national 5G mmWave footprints. Cable companies, such as Cox, and WISPs like Starry and OneRing will likely compete for select licenses in their target service areas.

At the FCC’s December 12th meeting, the Commission voted to move ahead with upper 37, 39, and 47 GHz spectrum auctions towards the end of 2019. The 38/39 GHz spectrum is still full of RSA encumbrances as well as the legacy channel interleaving so it will likely take much of 2019 for that band to be cleaned up and ready for auction. The 37 and 47 GHz bands also have some satellite and government encumbrances. As such, winners of the 24 and 28 GHz auctions will have a slight head start with both spectrum and equipment availability relative to the other mmWave bands to be auctioned later this year.

Carrier-grade Enterprise Access

The national carriers like Verizon and AT&T have largely kept away from fixed wireless for enterprise access, instead focusing on expanding their metro fiber footprints. That could begin to change in 2019 and 2020 depending on the success of their 5G fixed wireless residential deployments. Local and regional CLECs, like Windstream and TPX have embraced fixed wireless and they should continue to expand their deployments in 2019, especially as they get access to more spectrum. For the competitive carriers, fixed wireless offers a facilities-based option to provide carrier grade enterprise access without the expense of trenching fiber. They can also use it to offer a true diversity solution for enterprises that require continuity of service.

Residential Broadband

Verizon began to deploy a non-standards based 5G fixed wireless solution in select residential markets through the second half of 2018. We would expect to see those deployments expand in 2019 and eventually replaced by fully standards-compliant radio units. AT&T has tested and expressed interest in offering 5G residential FWA service, but they need to sort out their mmWave spectrum situation first, so likely will not explore commercial residential deployments until later in 2019. Local and regional telcos and WISPs will likely be more active with residential fixed wireless as they get access to additional licensed spectrum in the mmWave bands as well as the lower frequency CBRS band.

In 2019 we should also see an expansion of fixed wireless for serving Multi Dwelling Units (MDUs). Established providers like DirecTV as well as start-ups like Starry view fixed wireless as a cost-effective way to provide competitive broadband Internet services to MDU customers versus the traditional LECs and cable companies. Customers would then purchase over the top content.

So, those are thoughts. If you would like to discuss how FWA can help your business in 2019 or beyond, please do contact us at enquiries@cbnl.com.

I look forward to speaking with you.

Eric Miller
VP 5G Business Development
CBNL

Published 04 May 2018 in Research
Tags: 5G, Connectivity, testbed, collaboration
CBNL's Dr John Naylon, CTO & Founder

Dr John Naylon, CTO & Founder CBNL

 

In March, UK5G launched in London with the aim of providing impartial, expert advice to shape the future of UK connectivity. As part of the unveiling, UK5G announced an Advisory Board to offer guidance, support and recommendations to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) on plans for managing and implementing 5G network technology in the UK. It’s an honour for me to join other leaders in 5G on the Advisory Board, working side-by-side with technology providers, regulators and vertical industry partners.

UK5G will bring together the constituent parts of the UK 5G ecosystem to help drive the deployment of next generation network technology in the UK. This will create a community of users, operators, vendors and academics, in conjunction with the public sector, which can evangelise and articulate the benefits of digital development and 5G services.

The UK5G Advisory Board aims to act as a forum for sharing knowledge from emerging 5G R&D activity, enabling collaboration between industry players and the identification of key developments in the 5G space. As we approach the implementation of 5G technology in the UK, it’s encouraging to see the government work with the private sector to share best practice, provide information and build a network for communication and collaboration with key stakeholders. UK5G is a unique opportunity to link industry players, research and the public sector to help promote the development of 5G.

By offering a framework for initiating testbeds, funding trials and network support projects, the project will help cement the UK’s position as a world leader in technology. It’s heartening to see so many influencers and innovators in the 5G space join together to help make sure that the UK continues to lead the pack in the development and deployment of network technology. 

Here at CBNL, we are part of the world-renowned Cambridge technology cluster, but we also have extensive international experience, currently operating in over 50 countries. We will be bringing our international perspective and the knowledge gained in building over 150 networks to bear on UK5G’s mission, as well as our unique expertise in millimetre-wave networking.

The future of UK connectivity rests on this kind of effective transfer of knowledge to ensure we build future-proofed networks that can underwrite innovation, productivity and growth now and in the future. I’m delighted to join my fellow industry leaders and key players in Britain’s 5G ecosystem to advise the government. By working with a broad cross section of academics, vendors and end users, UK5G can help deliver the next generation of connectivity in this country.

 

About UK5G:

UK5G is a consortium partnership between Cambridge Wireless (CW), Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) and TM Forum. It also has the Digital Catapult and Real Wireless as associate partners.

www.uk5g.org

Published 05 December 2017 in Research
Tags: 5G, fixed wireless, UK Enterprise Broadband Index, Ofcom

Dr John Naylon, CTO and founder, CBNL

CBNL was recently joined by leading experts in the field of 5G for a roundtable chaired by Emeka Obiodu (Strategy Director at the GSMA) to explore the status and future of UK enterprise broadband. 

With me on the panel were: Jonathan Dann (Managing Director of Telecom Research at RBC Capital Markets), Mischa Dohler (Professor of Wireless Communications at King’s College London) and Nick Lane (Chief Analyst at Mobilesquared).

Meeting in London, we discussed today’s connectivity landscape, the evolution of operator business models, and the role of new technology in the evolving pre-5G ecosystem. 

Supplementing the panel was the announcement of the ‘UK Enterprise Broadband Index.’ 

The survey, commissioned by CBNL, revealed that all UK businesses have experienced some issues with poor broadband services in the last two years. 

The most significant of these pertain to slow, or slower-than-advertised, broadband speeds, and substantial periods of network downtime. 

However, more than half of these businesses have not acted on these problems, instead choosing to remain with the same broadband provider.

With 89% of companies stating they would consider moving to wireless broadband, the research highlights the changing market perceptions towards this technology. 

In all likelihood, this is driven by the universal reliance of people upon mobile broadband, and their generally good experiences with it.

This striking statistic, and others within the index, provided a framework for a discussion of the current challenges facing the UK enterprise broadband market. 

The very high acceptance of wireless technology highlights the potential for disruptive wireless service providers to reconcile the digital divide and shape the future of connectivity.

The market status of UK enterprise broadband

The burgeoning demand for increased connectivity in the UK and the simultaneous acceptance of poor connectivity was a paradox my co-panelists unanimously acknowledged, and most had experienced directly.

This anecdotal evidence is supported by CBNL’s survey, which indicated that whilst 83% of businesses surveyed said that their connectivity requirements were being met by their broadband provider, 47% admit they are not receiving the broadband speeds advertised, 35% have been negatively impacted by slow broadband speeds, and 34% have experienced significant periods of downtime. 

With penetration of fixed wireless in the UK below many comparable regions of the globe, it’s plausible that a lack of exposure to alternative broadband solutions is contributing to the UK market’s acceptance of poor connectivity. 

To facilitate economic growth, the UK should seek to augment the range of technologies available to consumers with an emphasis on scalable solutions which can effectively meet growing demand.

The evolution of operator business models

Quickly moving from problem to opportunity, we proceeded to discuss the market opportunities for disruptive carriers seeking to leverage alternative solutions, such as fixed wireless.

Despite businesses looking for faster and more reliable broadband, when asked why they were opting to remain with their current provider, 32% of survey participants said they wanted to avoid disruption. 

Reflecting on this, Nick Lane commented: 

“The rapid deployment of fixed wireless solutions will be fundamental to improving the connectivity ecosystem, and as such needs to be a key focus for investment.”

“Operators leveraging these wireless solutions for enterprise can also benefit from their efficiency to build a more attractive business case to meet consumer demand, which at times is outpacing the capabilities of some of today’s legacy broadband services.”

Significant advances in millimetre wave have also meant that modern high-capacity wireless technologies have a clear path to quickly scale networks to multi-gigabit speeds, a capability that appears increasingly attractive for under-served UK businesses.

With such a clear and attractive business case, fixed wireless is presenting operators with a lucrative prospect for investment and establishing itself as a vital part of a diversified connectivity ecosystem.

New technology and the future of UK connectivity

Looking to the future, it is clear that recent advances in wireless sit alongside a significant market opportunity for operators.

Although fixed wireless is not as prevalent in the UK as fixed line, there was no dispute amongst us that the market’s perceptions of new technology is growing warmer. 

Underpinning this, the CBNL Enterprise Broadband Index revealed that 89% of businesses would consider moving to wireless services if the speed and reliability was comparable to, or greater than, their existing broadband.

Ofcom’s recent call for inputs to inform their programme of work to make millimeter wave spectrum bands available for 5G is also a significant indication of the value of high-capacity wireless in the UK market.

Increasing availability of millimetre wave, such as the 26GHz band, will be vital to unlock investment in enterprise broadband, allowing operators to benefit from the full potential of high band spectrum and catalyse the regeneration of a more diverse marketplace.

With the potential of these new technologies uncapped, panellist opinion was unified in its agreement that wireless innovation can bridge the gaps in the UK broadband market and pave the way for the next generation of connectivity.

Published 20 February 2017 in 5G FWA
Tags: 5G, fixed wireless, UK

Dr John Naylon, CTO and founder, CBNL

Ofcom has set out its timeline for spectrum allocation and anticipated deployment of 5G, which is an enormous step forwards in accelerating the next generation of connectivity in the UK.

According to the plans, the UK is expected to see pre-commercial networks as close as 2018, ahead of a 2020 launch.

The proposal outlines plans to utilise 3.4GHz to 3.6GHz, which are already cleared by public sector organisations, and will be auctioned later in 2017.

Spectrum in the 26GHz band will also play a pivotal role, with Ofcom launching a consultation process for this in the second half of 2017.

26GHz undoubtedly holds huge potential to provide bandwidth far in excess of today’s typical “fibre broadband” speeds that many homes and businesses receive.

As a result, we’re likely to see 5G fixed wireless emerge as the first 5G use case in the near term, followed by a wealth of new and exciting 5G use cases, including automotive, IoT and mobility.

This model closely follows the US market, where the FCC recently opened up vast amounts of flexible use, high frequency spectrum in the 28, 37 and 39GHz bands as part of its 5G Spectrum Frontiers proposal.

Over the last year, we’ve already seen many thousands of homes and businesses in the US receiving 100Mbps+ pre-5G fixed wireless services through adjacent bands to 26GHz.

Ofcom are adopting a highly progressive strategy, allowing operators to combine the complementary properties of both low and high band spectrum.

The superfast carrier-grade bandwidth of 26GHz is coupled with the wider coverage of 3.5GHz, creating a harmonised strategy to offer a more economically feasible strategy to connect the many homes and business across the UK that still don’t receive adequate broadband services.

As we have seen in recent news, there are many businesses, even in large cities like London, that can’t get timely access to the connectivity needed for modern commerce.

This move therefore holds enormous promise to provide a significant boost to the UK economy.

With the wireless technology already in place to utilise these frequencies, UK mobile operators and ISPs are perfectly placed to deliver an immediate uplift in connectivity to their customers once this spectrum becomes available.

 

Just one week to go until MWC...

If you are interesting in finding out more, I'll be speaking at the 5G Beyond the Hype: Value And Building Blocks seminar at Mobile World Congress a week today (16.00, 27 February, Hall 4 Auditorium 4).

We will also have a live demonstration of our VectaStar solution on display at CBNL’s booth in Hall 5 (5H27) during the show

For more information on booking a meeting with CBNL, visit our event page.

I hope to see you there.